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it in the fascinating relationship between president obama and mohammed morsi. two mag ma tist pragmatists trya way to mediate this. you see it in the backdrop of surprising riots in jordan which will cause increasing problems, you have that changing environment which you know far more about. but the arab street needs something different. these governments now need to be more responsive to their people so that is an opening for a different relationship. and the president, no american president is going to criticize israel's launching of this war. but this is an opening for a relationship with egypt, with turkey, to implement a cease-fire that will monitor arms smuggling into gaza. that will monitor israel's relationship. overarching all of it, such a painful issue to discuss. overarching -- all of it is a history. going back at least to '67. of the united states' role, maybe, the united states' role as the enabler. as the political diplomatic economic military enabler of an israeli policy. in many ways, a younger generation is seeing israelis, that is not in the long-term benefit of the security of
. they are doing it, secretly. >> mohammed morsi's attempt at compromise meeting with the chief judges in cairo, giving verbal assurances that the sweeping powers would only be temporary and limited to unspecified sovereign matters has done nothing to stem unrest. schools and many businesses were closed today due to demonstrations. planned march by muslim brotherhood in support of mohammed morsi was canceled to reduce the chance of conflict between the two sides. >> opposition leaders say there will be no negotiations, no deals made with the president unless he backs down completely and withdraws his decree. otherwise, they say, they will stay out in the street. bret? >> bret: steve harrigan live early wednesday morning in cairo. thank you. palestinian authorities today opened the grave of former leader yasser arafat to take samples from his remains. arafat died in 2004. ostensibly from a stroke. but speculation he was poise -- speculation he was poisoned resurfaced this summer after elevated surface of radioactive substance were detected on his clothing. >>> activists in syria say dozen of peo
mohammed morsi and the chief judiciary council so there could be a opportunity for one side to step back from the precipice which is growing loud and dangerous here in cairo. >> shannon: thank you. >> we think mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease-fire, which is fragile, but this is not acceptable. this is not what the united states of america taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy, which you promised the people of egypt when your party and you were elected president. >> that was senator john mccain saying while the egyptian president's efforts in the israeli palestinian conflict are to be applauded, it's time for president obama to condemn him. early today i sat down with chris wallace for the inside scoop on his interview with the senator. >> as things heat up you had senator john mccain with you today to talk about mohammed morsi power grab. >> he's concerned. does the old saying it's not the first election, it's the second election. once people get into power, do they continue the democratic system or grab all the power. h
is in cairo where she met with president mohamed morsi of egypt who's mediating the discussions. as secretary clinton carries the official white house message there is new attention being paid to the president's strategic options in the region. "the washington post" writes president obama's decision to send his top diplomat on an emergency middle east peace making mission tuesday marked an administration shift to a more active vist role in the region's affairs and offered clues to how he may use the political elbow room afforded by a second term. beyond a cease-fire agreement, the president could try to throw his political clout behind a larger, long-term solution here. so far, no deal has materialized between israel and gaza. also, a bus bombing in tel aviv could push both sides further apart. 19 people were injured, three critically, in what was the first terror attack in israel in four years. police say, however, the incident was not a suicide bombing. joining me now, former assistant secretary of state, p.j. crowley and from tel aviv, nbc news correspondent stephanie gosk. thank you, both
is citizens of israel. >> and particularly about egyptian president mohammed morsi. i wanted to play you a brief clip from a campaign rally. in may of this year. this was a rally mohammed morsi was at. i wanted to play for you what it said. >> this was morsi, and was saying that the united states of the arabs will be restored this by this man, the capital will be jerusalem and come on, you lovers of martyrdom. do you trust morsi? >> we focus on deeds rather than words an egypt has filled a constructive role in the past and we hope egypt will continue to fill that role. >> do you think this could if you do have a deal, lead to a real working relationship with the morsi government, or is this something you think is just way too stacked? >> we're always welcoming of an improvement with egypt. we've had a peace treaty for 34 years. that is essential for us, but no less crucial for the egyptians. we all need stability and particularly, egypt now, needs that stability and we have every reason to believe that interest will continue. >> thanks as always for your time. >> thank you. >> we have ne
today. martha: egyptian president mohammed morsi predicting and in the fighting between israel and gaza strip a perhaps within hours. you would not know it hearing the sirens blaring this hour. there is a scheduled arrival of secretary hillary clinton. this is now we start a brand-new "america's newsroom." i'm martha maccallum. bill: i'm bill hemmer. so far no evidence of that claim by president morsi. secretary clinton left a meeting with president obama. her first stop will be a meeting with prime minister benjamin netanyahu. martha: steven hayes, good morning to you, what do you expect to khreup hillary clinton's visit? >> i think it's an important visit. right now israel needs the united states to be a strong advocate and ally. if you look forward and look at the landscape that is facing israel, particularly over the next year, both in the short term fighting with hamas and then in the long term when you look at potential unrest in syria, in iran, in the region generally, i think this. during this fight the united states needs to signal that we are going to be with israel and going
with this muslim brotherhood path mohamed morsi. what are the charges he's interested in compromise? >> reporter: he has shown no signs of making a concession. the opposition says they will stay put in tahrir square. they say they won't negotiate until the president makes a complete stepdown. what we could see are parts of the government simply refusing to work. that's what we saw today with two courts. the judges saying we are not going to work until the president backs down. martha: steve harrigan, thank you very much. bill: who exactly is president morsi. he's 61 years old, born in egypt. but educated in the united states. got a ph.d in engineering from the university of southern california in 1982. he also worked for nasa developing engines for the space shuttle program. martha: interesting. president morsi is the leader of the muslim brotherhood he was narrowly elected in june of this year. he became a member of the muslim brotherhood when the organization was banned. one of his goals is to create a state ruled by islamic or sharia laws. the u.s. does not consider the muslim brotherhood a f
-fire, the u.s. is trying to use every diplomatic contact it has from mohamed morsi, the president of egypt, to the prime minister of turkey, prime minister erdogan to get the cease-fire. i think that the interesting question, the one that really -- the administration would love to focus on in the next few weeks is how do you get to a more stable situation in gaza where israel doesn't have to periodically take out heavy weapons and threaten the ground assault. we don't know yet whether that will happen. and people are talking about lots of possibilities. again, the central change that would be most beneficial would be if the new egyptian government decided to really get involved and in effect take ownership of the problems in gaza as the closest backer, supporter, of hamas. and if that happened, you'd have a quite different situation and one that potentially would be a lot better for israel. >> rose: and where are the -- where are the turks and where are the emir of qatar on this issue? >> i think both the turks and the qatarrys are supportive in general but the people with real leverage ar
president mahmoud abbas. before flying out to cairo to consult with egyptian president mohammed morsi at the center of the efforts to bring durable cease-fire. the violence in gaza was jeff shadowing president obama's trip to asia, which was supposed to be a calm swan song enabling the outgoing secretary of state to bask over her work in countrys like burma. instead, both spent much of their time in asia intensively dialing up mideast leaders. the president speaking with morsi three times in 24 hours. including aboard air force one on the way home to america. the president tan secretary both been on the phone, nonstop with regional leaders for a number of days. the purpose of her trip is to continue and intensify that engagement now face to face. >> the stakes for the president are enormous on the eaves of a second term. with analysts warping it may be the beginning of a much wider conflict between israel and iran. >> there is rise of al-qaeda and radical islam in the middle east that have taken advantage of the re-lutionnary change sweeping through the region. in the shadows here is
to the government in egypt, the president mohamed morsi, that they would stop firing into israel. if that were to be revoked, that would be a violation. they would be breaking their word to the egyptians and that would cause some serious repercussions i assume, christiane, between the egypt government, muslim brotherhood-led government, and hamas. >> reporter: well, i was obviously talking about what's the perspective from this side was. but of course israel's demand was that there would be no more rockets and no more of that fire going into israel. that was something they really wanted. and of course israel does not want to see hamas resupplied through the tunnel network. that is still to be worked out. i asked him whether or not he got weapons and whether hamas was getting weapons from iran, and he gave me a non-confirmation confirmation. it's an open secret that they come through those tunnels. so that has to be taken in hand. we're not sure how that's going to happen, but obviously there is some egyptian role in that as well. but, yes, egypt is the guarantor of this cease-fire. neither sid
president mohammed morsi on his flight back from cambodia with tom done lyn done donalan on. they are choosing their words carefully. >> they will improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. >> reporter: we know defense secretary leon panetta has had a conversation with his counterpart reiterating essentially the determination of the u.s. to stand side-by-side with the israelis to work together with them on israel's safety and security. ainsley: are white house officials now able to turn their attention to some more traditional matters? >> reporter: they are. the president of course could have a phone call or two if foreign leaders if they are warranted. for now we saw the president and the first family going to the washington area capitol food bank to handout meals to young people, and also the elderly. more traditional activities for the first family. they were joined by the oregon state basketball team which is coached by the first lady's brother greg robinson. the president says thanksgiving is a chance to put it all in perspecti
in for jon scott. with egypt's president mohammed morsi, it is a big test for the new leader. steve harrigan is live in cairo. some are saying that mohammed morsi is the real winner here. you have all sides facing the same person. americans giving him high marks for his mediation, even some israeli officials praising the president. as far as the mediation goes, there were some concerns about which direction he would say, a long-term member of the muslim brotherhood and a public sympathizer of hamas. and in the end, he worked closely with u.s. officials about that days of violence. he had all those conversations with president obama. >> we are wondering. he is trying to change the constitution and give themselves more power. what can you tell us about that? >> some dramatic developments which have just occurred in the last hours, and we have had four days of protests. they could be extremely large tomorrow. what the egyptian president has done is basically said that no one can overrule any of his decrees since he became president in june. not even the courts. he also said any of those guilty
gotten the basic answers. >>> protesters demand an end to mohamed morsi's seizure of absolute power. >>> american civil liberties union is suing the pentagon to remove all restrictions on women in battle, calling the current strate strategy discriminatory. >> you're one of 12 kids, is that right? >> i'm one of 11 kids. >> well, you're probably catholic, right? we're just hillbillys. >>> reportedly lost his job over the map app. >>> premiere of "the hobbit" is getting under way. new z new zealand has unveiled a hobbit-themed airplane. of course, real hobbit fans only fly virgin. >>> welcome to "cbs this morning." we're in washington where lawmakers have just 34 days left to reach a deal before the a potentiaff deadline. that ning funded by cbs confidence is slowly starting to fade away and major is with us >>> major garret is with us in the studio. what's happening? >> americans might say, look, it feels like time is running out. they would be correct. nal republicwhite house and ote mostional republicans say they'll devote most if not all of this week, and things are slowing down an
the regime of mohammed morsi. this new government is allied closely with hamas. would egypt intervene notwithstanding the peace treaty with israel? >> that is going to be a very tall order for president morsi. yes he is the head of the government and it's in the hands of the muslim brotherhood. egypt is their ally. so out of cairo will be a lot of statements and maybe they could escalated against the camp david agreement. to say that the egyptian armed forces to be pouring into battle by their president is a very difficult thing to imagine. what could happen now is negotiation between cairo, israel and the united states to find a way for a cease-fire. >> gregg: hamas fighters are no match for the israeli military. last ground invasion killed over 1400 palestinians which invites the question, why would hamas break this truce by escalating the rocketed attacks on israel unless they are being directed to do it by their benefactors, their supporters, tehran? >> you know what, this could be the most important question for the debate about the gaza war. i am among those who think hamas does
? the president mohammed morsi knows that this is happening? >> i will put it this way. the weaponry goes to the red sea from iran. they also come from libya and at certain points, they all cost to egyptian territory. certainly, there is a responsibility to step up to the plate and stop the smuggling. egypt has been constructed from the past. we hope they will continue to fulfill this role now in the future. jenna: i ask that question because we know how important this relationship is for your country and all of ours. i want to talk about "the new york times" article that he wrote about today. it was published and he said that hamas is not interested in peace. they want violence and they want to promote terror. it is not a rational thing according to the way that you laid this out. why negotiate at all through any here in this region? >> they don't want to negotiate at all, they don't want to speak with us. they want to destroy us. they don't actually want to just kill israelis, but jews throughout the world. they are a genocide organization. but they can negotiate with egypt and others w
as the appeals report suspends work to protest the decrease that gave mohammed morsi near absolute powers. steve harrigan is live in cairo with the very latest, steve. >> those protestors are out again for the 6th night in a row at tahrir square scuffling with police. we've seen exchanges of rocks and teargas on both sides, several protestors coming away injured, police injured as well. nowhere near the numbers we saw last night where as many as 200,000 demonstrators were in the square. they are demanding not only that the president pull back on his decrease but the entire government gets toppled. judges from two of the courts including the appeals court has gone on strike. they say they are not going to work again until the president takes a step back. we are seeing no comprises from president mohammed morsi. in fact we are hearing from his supporters in the muslim brotherhood that they plan on staging major marchs across the nation on saturday in support of mohammed morsi. they have kept their distance perhaps trying to reduce of conflict between two sides. megyn: steve harrigan thank you. new
're with us. i'm jenna lee. jon:. i'm jon scott. the first elected leader, president mohammed morsi expected to come face-to-face with senior judges in egypt who say his power grab has gone too far. there are indications that the both side are trying to find some middle ground. morsi's maneuver unleased a rage of protests that continues to rage across the country. meanwhile the u.s. embassy in cairo says there are sporadic clashes between protesters and police near its entrance. we're told some rocks landed inside the walls of that huge compound. embassy officials say there is no indication they are the target. egypt wields enormous influence in the middle east peac process. that power demonstrated by brokering the cease-fire between is rainfall and hamas. steve care began streaming live too cairo with the latest developments right now. steve? >> reporter: jon, this is a key meeting between egypt's president and the chief justices in cairo. already there are hints from the president's side that compromise may be in the offing. perhaps a scaling down of that presidential decree which basicall
will head to cairo where she'll have face-to-face meetings with egyptian president mohamed morsi. >> the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security and legitimate aspirations of israelis and palestinians alike. >> want to begin with reza sayah, live for us in cairo. she mentioned in her comments that she is on her way to have meetings with the egyptian president, morsi, at the same time, offering any assistance that israel might need. tell me a little bit about the positioning and navigating she has to do in her meeting with mr. morsi. >> soledad, we can report to you that, according to the u.s. embassy here, secretary clinton has arrived here in cairo and she's going to be meeting with egyptian president mohamed morsi very soon. with the violence escalating, the spotlight, the pressure is on secretary clinton and washington. the u.s. seems to be broadening its role. the key role the u.s. is going to play here is with its sway over israel. obviously, israel and washington are best friends. washington has a lot of influence with israe
's for this man, president mohammed morsi whom america relies on to be a regional peace broker. it has led to days of bloody clashes. the crowed is chanting erhal, or leave. these are many of the same chants we heard two years ago during the revolution, except that they've substituted mubarak for morsi. egyptians toppled president hosni mubarak, the dictator who ruled for three decades. they then held an historic election and voted in a new president. >> he's like a pharaoh. >> reporter: morsi's office says it is temporary to put egypt on the right track. tonight the wise voices say it's far from fear that will win the showdown, but there are certainly more bloody days ahead on egypt's bumpy road to democracy. alex marquardt, abc news, cairo. >>> and back here at home we want to tell you about another food alert out tonight and this one is about pork. a big consumer report study found a high rate of contamination in pork chops and ground pork from a kind of bacteria that can send you to the emergency room. abc's dr. richard besser brings us the whole picture. >> reporter: you don't know its name,
is a tinderbox as protests grow against president mohamed morsi. more than 200,000 people jammed the square to protest morsi's layton power grab last week. the crowd chanting for morsi to leave, echoing the call from the revolution that tossed hosni mubarak. >>> an investigation has revealed that the factory made clothes for walmart, sears and our parent company, disney. and there have been three factory officials suspected of locking the doors, dooming those workers inside. 112 people died in the fire. >>> the tampa socialite caught up in the petraeus sex scandal is now fighting back. attorneys for jill kelley are going after a new york man, who claimed kelley tried to use her connection to petraeus to broker a deal. this morning's "new york times" reports the investigation into e-mails between kelley and general john allen, are only about 70 messages of the thousands the 2 exchanged. >>> bob dole is expected to be released from a washington area hospital this morning, after undergoing a routine procedure. dole ran for president against bill clinton back in 1996. >>> people of northern cal
read a verse from the koran and later egypt's president mohammed morsi gave a fiery speech in support of the palestinian people on state tv. listen. >> we support the people of gaza. what hurts them, hurts us. >> hate and violence between the israelis and palestinians was sparked by this. israel's assassination of hamas's military chief on wednesday. an assassination that israel called necessary because of increased rocket attacks from gaza into israel the last several weeks. our senior international correspondent ben wiederman has been covering the middle east. you've been covering it for decades now. when you see israel moving hundreds of troops to the border of israel and gaza and saying it's going to call up 16,000 more reservists, what does that sound like they're preparing for? >> certainly would case that they're preparing for a ground invasion of gaza. in fact, this is very similar to what happened in the 2008, 2009 fight between hamas and israel. israel for the first few days pounded targets around gaza, and then sent in the troops. certainly, i mean, if you listen, for insta
expect? the people will be poor. >> maybe the position of egypt and today president mohammed morsi said this? >> translator: we are with them, what hurts us and the blood that flows from their children is our blood, too opinion. >> what did you make of that? >> we preferred to look at egyptian deeds rather than words. egypt has played a constructive role in the past in mediating cease-fires with gaza and we hope that the egyptians will continue to fulfill a constructive role in the future. >> you must have been disconcerted by the tone of president morsi's rhetoric there. >> again, we prefer to look at the egyptian deeds and they will play a constructive role in helping convince them to stop firing these thousands of rockets at our civilians. >> is your intention at the same time to continue targeting hamas leaders and to continue, if you can, killing them? >> well, we'll take any measures necessary to stop the aggression against the civilians and we're taking immense precautions not to hurt palestinian civilians. our planes have carried out hundreds of attacks and the number of palesti
questions that need answers. abc news, washington. >> a simmering protest against mohammed morsi's power grab erupted violence today in tahrir square. one demonstrateor reportedly killed by a canister during a running street battle. 100,000 egyptians are protesting against the debris -- decree granting morsi absolute control of the country. demonstrators are afraid it will lead to a dictatorship. >> officials took samples from yas yas yas's body. his widow requested on whether he was killed by israeli agents using a radio active poison a charge israel denied. yair fat was 75 years old when he died eight years ago. >> the bangladesh called a factory fire that killed 111 garment workers the work of an arsonist, labeling it sabotage but they're not releasing anymore information about a motive. closings dr dr clothing from the western states are made there. protestors marched through the streets. >> a bold move by fda shut down the biggest organic peanut butter plant in the country. we told you with this yesterday at 4:00. today, more about what fda inspectors found inside of that facility.
mohammed morsi will try to explain reasons for giving himself nearly absolute power. he and his backer notice muslim brotherhood argued he needed to do it to speed along the transition to a new government. the move has sparked new rallies which have turned violent at times. [chanting] >> shepard: meantime judges on egypt's highest court who lost their power under this decree today went on strike and say they will not return to work until the president gives up the sweeping powers that he somehow granted himself. palestinian leaders predict they are going to score historic win tomorrow when the united nations votes on whether to recognize a palestinian state. analysts expect the vote to pass and by a big majority it would grant palestine only limited understood -- statehood. against the effort it could give palestinians new leverage against israel. mahmoud abbas has said he will not negotiate with israel as long as it keeps expanding settlements in the west bank. and the israeli prime minister has refused to freeze that construction. "the fox report's" correspondent jonathan hunt is at
by president mohammed morsi. there were more clashes today. in cairo's tahrir square. police fired tear gas at some of the demonstrators. some of them through the can -- threw canisters back at police. >> iran is showcasing several additions to the navy. missile firing warship launched today near the strait of hormuz. they took liberty of two submarines and hovercrafts. the country nuclear chief says uranium enrichment will move ahead with intensity. he says there will be a sharp increase in number of centrifuges used to make the nuclear fuel. at least 34 people were killed today in twin suicide car bombings in the syrian capital. state media say the bombs ripped through a parking lot near a cluster of commercial buildings in a damascus suburb. rebels are claiming they shot down a syrian air force jet today as well. international momentum may be building for the latest move by palestinians. to get united nations recognition. david lee miller on what the u.s. intends to do. >> on the streets of ramallah, on the west bank. posters can already be seen exclaiming state of palestine, member of t
. the biggest story we're follow something what's going on in egypt with what's going on with mohammed morsi who has come on the stage in a big way now, specificallys it relates to negotiating the truth between hamas and israel. he was center stage and taken this leading role of starting to become a statesman in the arab world. he decreed himself a number of additional powers, which harks back to the time of the mubarak era. some in the opposition in egypt say who named you the new pharaoh? there is thousands of people heading into cairo's tahrir square. some said that number is growing by the minute. these are people in opposition to the muslim brotherhood president who says that he is turning egypt into far too much of an islamic state. that's something to watch going forward. as noon prayers have ended here on this friday afternoon and protesters scheduled in egypt and also in iman, jordan. inside egypt, made a lot of news over the past couple of days. one of the top collaboration in the -- clerics, is now saying that jihad is, quote, obligatory towards muslims and being very, very tough abou
in the days ahead. president obama also spoke last night with egypt president mohamed morsi about working together to preserve peace and security in the region. tension between israel and egypt's new islamist government has increased since the attacks with egypt recalling its ambassador to israel in protest. richard haass, also an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council last night. sift through this for us. how big is this? how significant is this in the middle east right now? >> well, it's big for lots of reasons, because it's not happening in isolation. one is you have the largest military clashes between israel and hamas in, what, four year now, and it's not going to stop. at times it doesn't matter in the middle east exactly why things begin. over the last few months there have been hundreds of rocket attacks, now this, then retaliation. it just happens. second of all, it's happening in the absence of anything political. there's no dialogue going on whatsoever between israelis and palestinians. this can't substitute for this. thirdly, egyptians withdrew their ambassador. since
, forging new relations with rob morrison -- mohamed morsi, seeing how the arab world is post the arab spring. testing hezbollah and testing president obama, who interestingly immediately threw his lot in with israel. the president didn't say we want to call for cessation of hostilities and calm, he said we agree with israel's right to defend itself. israel's real enemy is iran. if remember netanyahu was at the u.n. holding up his bomb chart. he wasn't talking about hamas. he was talking about iran. that is israel's overriding threat. they have been able to deal with hamas pretty handedly. i've seen just yesterday israeli warships able to take out a single hamas militant who was sitting in a chair by the waterfront. so one warship fired a rocket. you could barely see the ship on the horizon and take out an individual militant. israel has been telephoning the houses of neighbors of hamas militants and telling them to get out of their houses. it has their phone numbers. so there is something suspicious about this. israel has too much intelligence on hamas, has been able to deal with hama
in the summit meetings then. from there, he spoke with benjamin netanyahu and mohamed morsi about ongoing fighting in ga gaza. and hostess isn't liquidating just yet. they'll be in mediation to work out differences. back to "hardball." >>> we're back. according to some reports, the president could name a successor to hillary clinton as early as next week. i think it could come this week. it's a decision fraught with risk. "the new york times" reported yesterday that the white house aides say the president's favored candidate is susan rice, the current ambassador to the u.n. but republicans like senator john mccain and lindsey graham have threatened to filibuster her nomination thanks to her appearances on tv following the benghazi attacks. would the president risk starting off his second term with a decision that would likely lead to a bitter confrontation fight? richard wolffe is vice president and executive editor of msnbc.com. he's also an msnbc political analyst. and jay newton-small is a diplomatic correspondent for "time." richard, i want to get your sense of the president's thinkin
24 hours to egyptian president mohamed morsi who has been leading the negotiations in cairo. and secretary of
. >> seemingly unexpected leader was egypt's mohamed morsi, a man we've seen at rallies where egyptians chanted we are hamas. it's an impressive feat and the first time that israel has ever negotiated with an islamist government. but there are some shady things about the deal. according to an israeli newspaper, neither side officially signed penned to paper on the cease-fire agreement which raise sometimes questions about it. and here's what we know is in the verbal deal. israel has agreed to hold its fire and end attacks against top militants and this is important, promise to look at ways to ease its blockade of the gaza border. hamas agreed not to strike any israeli targets and agreed there is no passage of weapons into gaza and to insure other palestinian groups in the gaza strip stop their attacks. if you're shaking your head that some of these things are very tall order, well, you're right. later "outfront" we have the key players, israel's foreign deputy minister and leerd of the plo to the united states. they will be our guests and answer those questions. but cnn's ben wedeman is in gaza
that the new president of egypt, mohammed morsi who played a key role in this whole standoff, this conflict that he will be a force for peace in the future, gregg. >> gregg: so far so good. what about the president's second term if the cease-fire does not hold? >> violence in the middle east, a threat of a war could easily evaporate a lot of presidential time or take up a lot of his time and energy and bottom line, if there is a threat of violence in the middle east once again. it could easily derail part of his second term agenda. a former bush white house advisor says like it or not, it is part of the job. >> the president has the responsibility for foreign policy. so, certainly, all eyes are on him and his administration to see what our reaction will be in keeping with our principles that israel is our closest ally in the region. and standing up for their defense. >> bottom line, when there is trouble in the middle east, folks tend to look here to the white house. and there are many examples in the course of history of events overtaking the plans of a white house team. gregg. >> gregg: o
: president mohamed morsi, gave himself almost unchecked powers and sent thousands into the streets, the people who have been helping to topple hosni mubarak, now, who they are calling the new egyptian pharaoh. are we headed for a you new islamist coup and islamist state in egypt. >> it could be headed that way and also could be headed back to a military takeover, if things went in the wrong direction. you could also see a scenario where there is continued chaos. i'll never forget, chris, after i was in egypt, i met with the young people who made the revolution in the square, and, a young woman said, senator mccain it's not the first election we worry about, it's the second. that is what we have to worry about, a repeat of the iranian experience in the 1970s, and -- but, what should the u.s. be doing, saying, this is unacceptable and thank mr. morsi for his efforts in brokering a cease-fire, which is, by the way, incredibly fragile but is not what is acceptable, what the american taxpayers expect and our dollars will be directly related to the progress towards democracy, which you p
. protesters in egypt staged nationwide rallies today against egyptian president mohamed morsi and his muslim brotherhood. in cairo, more than 100,000 people filled tahrir square to condemn morsi's decree that makes his decisions immune to judicial review. earlier, there were clashes between protesters and police. the rallies were some of the largest since the overthrow of president hosni mubarak last year. in syria, government warplanes bombed towns in the north and east, in the face of new advances by rebel fighters. in one attack, the planes dropped barrels filled with explosives and gasoline just west of idlib city. reports of the dead ranged from five to 20. the regime is using intensive air raids to try to beat back rebel gains. forensic experts took samples from the remains of yasser arafat today, hoping to determine once and for all if the late palestinian leader was poisoned. arafat died in 2004. his body was briefly exhumed today in ramallah, on the west bank. we have a report from john ray of independent television news. >> reporter: eight years after they buried him they sealed ya
reporting from the front lines. protesters took to the streets of cairo today after mohamed morsi basically stood by his decision to grant himself sweeping presidential powers and eliminate the judiciary. demonstrators called on morsi to roll back his decree or resign. at least one person died in clashes with police. demonstrators stormed the headquarters of a party backed by morsi's muslim brotherhood. a spokesman said the building was destroyed, dozens of injuries. >>> 213-foot crane caught fire, it partially collapsed. this was on to a university building in sidney today. the crane was carrying 264 gallons of diesel fuel, flames went 32 feet into the air. no one was injured according to the operator lend lease. i wanted to mention that name because it might sound familiar. it is the same company that operated the crane that partially collapsed in new york city during superstorm sandy. the company is still in the process of reviewing that incident. >>> well, for the first time since his arrest two years ago, bradley manning is expected to take the stand in a pretrial hearing this week. no
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